Last week the California Legislature passed and sent to the Governor a state budget by the June 15th constitutional deadline. The Governor has until June 30th to sign the $139 billion general fund spending plan. The budget approved reflects some augmentations since the May Revision last month and provides even more resources for issues of importance to CCJBH and our partners, most notably to support diversion and reentry strategies and address homelessness and the affordable housing crisis. In addition, there were investments in and changes for CCJBH. Overall this budget represents significant support for CCJBH priorities. Governor Brown has only used his line item veto authority very sparingly during his time in office so we suspect little to change from the June 14th budget submitted from the Legislature.

 

2018-2019 State Budget Analysis from CSAC at: http://www.counties.org/sites/main/files/file-attachments/legislatures_2018-19_budget_-_june_2018.pdf. Staff is still reviewing the content of trailer bills and therefore more detail will be available in the future.

 

Key 18-19 Budget issues of note since the submission of the May Budget Revision:

·        Provides CCJBH some additional resources to support the Department of State Hospitals in reviewing and supporting county proposals for funds for programs that demonstrate the potential to reduce referrals to DSH of felony ISTs. (See CSAC memo page 6 for details).

·        Provides CCJBH $795,000 annually, including one staff position, to establish a consumer contract to represent individuals with mental illness that are involved in the criminal justice system

·        Provides BSCC $87.3 million for “diversion” programs including $37.3 million for youth reinvestment and $50 million for adult reentry (CSAC memo pages 6-7)

·        Provides POST $25 million for use of force and de-escalating training, including $5 million for crisis mental health training

·        Provides the Department of Social Services $4 million in one-time funds to establish an intervention program with the goal of reducing law enforcement involvement with older youth placed in group homes, shelters, and STRTPs

·        Provides more than $700 million in funding to address homelessness, most notably doubling the May Revision’s $250 million to $500 million for the Emergency Homeless Aid Program. (For full details see CSAC memo pages 22-25)